Sunday, April 25, 2010

Barbara Fritchie Classic


Follow on Facebook here


Sports & Recreation - Extreme Sports


Like any bona fide classic, the Fritchie has stood the test of time. The Fritchie is held at The Great Frederick Fairgrounds.
It is the oldest running half mile in the country.
It's a Fourth of July tradition in Frederick. But when it started, the race wasn't even held on the Fourth. The Fritchie ran Memorial Day. And back then, it was called the Delphey Brothers Classic, promoted by J. Paul and Chester Delphey.

Privacy Type:

Open: All content is public.

If you enjoyed this post, please consider leaving a comment and subscribe to my RSS feed or via email to ensure you can enjoy the latest post(s).

More Jobs in Frederick Md from the official Frederick County WorkForce Postings:

Driver CDL Class A 
Frederick, Maryland 
Local business is seeking a professional Driver with CDL Class-A License. If you have furniture moving experience, take pride in your work, and possess good customer service skills, this may be just the job for you.
Salary: Competitive.
Qualifications: Minimum 2 years job related experience. Must be dependable, have an excellent work ethic, be able to lift a minimum of 100 pounds and pass a background check.
Apply: Visit for additional details. The job order number for this position is MD0844510.    

Shipping Coordinator
Frederick, Maryland 
Position available for individual experienced in Shipping and Receiving. In this position you will work within a computerized inventory system so computer skills are required. Must also be able to handle some lifting and physical work when necessary. Experience with inventory control, Fed Ex and UPS shipping methods and documentation are helpful.    
Salary: $14.00 per hour.
Qualifications: Minimum 3 years job related experience. Forklift experience and computer skills are required. Excellent communication skills are also a must
Apply: Visit for additional details. The job order number for this position is MD0595962.  

Supervisory Caregiver  
Frederick, Maryland 
Local assisted living facility is seeking compassionate individuals to assist residents with daily living activities.  Experience working with senior populations and Medication Management Certification preferred. Must show good judgment and problem solving skills in assisting our residents with their daily activities.
Salary: Competitive.
Qualifications: Previous job related experience. Candidates must be at least 18 years of age and should have written and verbal skills for effective communication and understanding..
Apply: Visit for additional details. The job order number for this position is MD0401003.

Construction Laborer
Frederick, Maryland 
Local company is seeking Construction Laborers to work in the Frederick area. One year construction experience is preferred but not required. You will be required to perform physical work outdoors. Day, evening and weekend shifts are available.
Salary: Competitive.
Qualifications: Steel toed boots and hand tools are required. We participate in the E-Verify process. Pre-employment drug test and background check required.   Apply: Visit for additional details. The job order number for this position is MD0876616.  

Office Manager 
Thurmont, Maryland 
The Office Manger will be responsible for payroll data; using Microsoft Outlook to manage the office calendar and contacts; communicating orally and in writing with suppliers and vendors; managing accounts payable and receivable; managing contract packages; managing permits, inspections and licensing requirements; handling human resources and training activities; drug free workplace program; monitoring safety training program; and managing day-to-day office operations. Successful candidate will be a highly motivated, self-starter and be customer service oriented. Must also have excellent interpersonal communication skills, have excellent organization and time management skills, be detail oriented, adaptable and flexible.
Salary: Competitive.
Qualifications: Minimum 5 years job related experience with a minimum 2 years of small construction company management experience. Expert with Microsoft Word, Outlook, Excel, and QuickBooks. Proficient in Microsoft Project.
Apply: Visit for additional details. The job order number for this position is MD0669786.

Saturday, April 10, 2010

Facebook and LinkedIn Can Get You Hired Or Fired

6 Career-Killing Facebook Mistakes

by Erin Joyce, Managing Editor
Wednesday, April 7, 2010
provided by
With more than 400 million active visitors, Facebook is arguably the most popular social networking site out there. And while the site is known for the casual social aspect, many users also use it as a professional networking tool. With that kind of reach, Facebook can be a valuable tool for connecting to former and current colleagues, clients and potential employers. In fact, surveys suggest that approximately 30% of employers are using Facebook to screen potential employees — even more than those who check LinkedIn, a strictly professional social networking site. Don't make these Facebook faux-pas — they might cost you a great opportunity.

More from

Dealing With 9 Coworker Personality Conflicts

A Bigger Salary or Better Benefits?
Is Your High-Profile Job Worth the Price?
1. Inappropriate Pictures
It may go without saying, but prospective employers or clients don't want to see pictures of you chugging a bottle of wine or dressed up for a night at the bar. Beyond the pictures you wouldn't want your grandparents to see, seemingly innocent pictures of your personal life will likely not help to support the persona you want to present in your professional life.

2. Complaining About Your Current Job
You've no doubt done this at least once. It could be a full note about how much you hate your office, or how incompetent your boss is, or it could be as innocent as a status update about how your coworker always shows up late. While everyone complains about work sometimes, doing so in a public forum where it can be found by others is not the best career move. Though it may seem innocent, it's not the kind of impression that sits well with a potential boss.

Popular Stories on Yahoo!:

12 Amazing Deductions That Got Approved

Great Real Estate Deals That Won't Last

Health Care Taxes on the Way

More from Yahoo! Finance
3. Posting Conflicting Information to Your Resume
If you say on your resume that your degree is from Harvard, but your Facebook profile says you went to UCLA, you're likely to be immediately cut from the interview list. Even if the conflict doesn't leave you looking better on your resume, disparities will make you look at worst like a liar, and at best careless.

4. Statuses You Wouldn't Want Your Boss to See
Everyone should know to avoid statuses like "Tom plans to call in sick tomorrow so he can get drunk on a Wednesday. Who cares that my big work project isn't done?" But you should also be aware of less flamboyant statuses like "Sarah is watching the gold medal hockey game online at her desk". Statuses that imply you are unreliable, deceitful, and basically anything that doesn't make you look as professional as you'd like, can seriously undermine your chances at landing that new job.

5. Not Understanding Your Security Settings
The security settings on Facebook have come a long way since the site started. It is now possible to customize lists of friends and decide what each list can and cannot see. However, many people do not fully understand these settings, or don't bother to check who has access to what. If you are going to use Facebook professionally, and even if you aren't, make sure you take the time to go through your privacy options. At the very least, your profile should be set so that people who are not your friend cannot see any of your pictures or information.

6. Losing by Association
You can't control what your friends post to your profile (although you can remove it once you see it), nor what they post to their own profiles or to those of mutual friends. If a potential client or employer sees those Friday night pictures your friend has tagged you in where he is falling down drunk, it reflects poorly on you, even if the picture of you is completely innocent. It's unfortunate, but we do judge others by the company they keep, at least to some extent. Take a look at everything connected to your profile, and keep an eye out for anything you wouldn't want to show your mother.

Facebook Can Help You Get Hired … or Fired
The best advice is to lock down your personal profile so that only friends you approve can see anything on that profile. Then, create a second, public profile on Facebook purely for professional use. This profile functions like an online resume, and should only contain information you'd be comfortable telling your potential employer face to face. Having a social networking profile is a good thing — it presents you as technologically and professionally savvy. Just make sure your profile is helping to present your best side — not the side that got drunk at your buddy's New Year's party.

Article first found on

If you enjoyed this post, please consider leaving a comment and subscribe to my RSS feed or via email to ensure you can enjoy the latest post(s).

Ten Ways to Use LinkedIn to Find a Job

by Guy Kawasaki

Searching for a job can suck if you constrain yourself to the typical tools such as online jobs boards, trade publications, CraigsList, and networking with only your close friends. In these kinds of times, you need to use all the weapons that you can, and one that many people don’t—or at least don’t use to the fullest extent, is
From Maryland Employment
LinkedIn has over thirty-five million members in over 140 industries. Most of them are adults, employed, and not looking to post something on your Wall or date you. Executives from all the Fortune 500 companies are on LinkedIn. Most have disclosed what they do, where they work now, and where they’ve worked in the past. Talk about a target-rich environment, and the service is free.
Here are ten tips to help use LinkedIn to find a job. If you know someone who’s looking for a job, forward them these tips along with an invitation to connect on LinkedIn. Before trying these tips, make sure you’ve filled out your profile and added at least twenty connections
  1. Get the word out. Tell your network that you’re looking for a new position because a job search these days requires the “law of big numbers” There is no stigma that you’re looking right now, so the more people who know you’re looking, the more likely you’ll find a job. Recently, LinkedIn added “status updates” which you can use to let your network know about your newly emancipated status.
  2. Get LinkedIn recommendations from your colleagues. A strong recommendation from your manager highlights your strengths and shows that you were a valued employee. This is especially helpful if you were recently laid off, and there is no better time to ask for this than when your manager is feeling bad because she laid you off. If you were a manager yourself, recommendations from your employees can also highlight leadership qualities.
  3. Find out where people with your backgrounds are working. Find companies that employ people like you by doing an advanced search for people in your area who have your skills. For example, if you’re a web developer in Seattle, search profiles in your zip code using keywords with your skills (for example, JavaScript, XHTML, Ruby on Rails) to see which companies employ people like you.
  4. Find out where people at a company came from. LinkedIn “Company Profiles” show the career path of people before they began work there. This is very useful data to figure out what a company is looking for in new hires. For example, Microsoft employees worked at Hewlett-Packard and Oracle.
  5. Find out where people from a company go next. LinkedIn’s “Company Profiles” also tell you where people go after leaving the company. You can use this to track where people go after leaving your company as well as employees of other companies in your sector. (You could make the case that this feature also enables to figure out which companies to avoid, but I digress.)
  6. Check if a company is still hiring. Company pages on LinkedIn include a section called “New Hires” that lists people who have recently joined the company. If you have real chutzpah, you can ask these new hires how they got their new job. At the very least you can examine their backgrounds to surmise what made them attractive to the new employer.
  7. Get to the hiring manager. LinkedIn’s job search engine allows you to search for any kind of job you want. However, when you view the results, pay close attention to the ones that you’re no more than two degrees away from. This means that you know someone who knows the person that posted the job—it can’t get much better than that. (Power tip: two degrees is about the limit for getting to hiring managers. I never help friends of friends of friends.) Another way to find companies that you have ties to is by looking at the “Companies in Your Network” section on LinkedIn’s Job Search page.
  8. Get to the right HR person. The best case is getting to the hiring manager via someone who knows him, but if that isn’t possible you can still use LinkedIn to find someone inside the company to walk your resume to the hiring manager or HR department. When someone receives a resume from a coworker even if she doesn’t know the coworker, she almost always pays attention to it.
Read more: on Guy Kawasaki's blog

David Bruce Jr
240 644-7530